Articles Tagged with guardianship

When a guardian has been appointed for a person with a disability (the “ward”) there are sometimes disagreements as to that person’s care.  These disagreements are usually between the guardian and the other relatives of the ward.  Sometimes a guardian may attempt to push the limits of their power by blocking visitation by the ward’s adult children.  In this circumstance, the adult children may feel like they have no options but to obey the commands of the guardian.  However, under Illinois law there is a remedy available for those children.

The Illinois Probate Act provides that an adult child of a ward may petition the court if it is believed that the guardian is unreasonably preventing visitation.  755 ILCS 5/11a-17(g)(2).  If the court finds visitation to be in the best interests of the ward, the court may order the guardian to allow visitation.  When determining whether visitation is in the ward’s best interests, the primary question the court will ask is whether the ward, if competent, would have wanted to engage in visitation with the adult child.

If the wishes of the ward cannot be determined, the court will then review the following factors to determine his/her best interests:

When a guardian is appointed for a person with a disability (the “ward”), the guardian is required to follow certain guidelines.  There are two types of guardianships in Illinois, and they each have different rules to follow.

The first is “guardianship of the person.”  The guardian of the person is responsible for securing the support, care, comfort, education, and professional services for the ward.  Pursuant to the Illinois Probate Act, the guardian of the person is also expected to assist the ward in the development of maximum self-reliance and independence.  Despite the fact that guardians seemingly have a substantial amount of authority, they are not given carte blanche permission to make every decision associated with the ward.  A guardian is still expected to listen to the wishes of the ward and make an effort to carry out those wishes.  Furthermore, a guardian cannot change the residential placement of the ward without explicit authorization from the court.  This prevents a guardian from being able to place a ward in a nursing home without a thorough investigation by the court to determine if that home is in the ward’s best interests.

The second type of guardianship is called the “guardianship of the estate.”  The estate guardian is responsible for handling the finances and assets of the ward.  He/she is expected to manage the estate frugally and apply the income and principal of the estate so far as necessary for the comfort and suitable support and education of the ward (755 ILCS 5/11a-18).  The guardian may make payments directly to the ward, or to a third party to pay for things like rent, food, clothing, entertainment, etc.  Once again, this is a significant amount of power, but it is not without its limits.  A guardian of the estate can only spend the ward’s assets on things that directly benefit the ward or the ward’s minor or adult dependent children.  If the guardian is not following these guidelines, it may be grounds for the guardian to be removed.

Many times clients will call our firm and state that they need a Power of Attorney for their elderly relative because he/she has dementia or some other condition which causes diminished capacity.  Unfortunately, depending on the current mental capacity of the relative, it may be too late for them to sign a Power of Attorney.  The person signing the Power of Attorney has to completely understand the document to which they are executing.  It is not simply enough to be able to physically sign one’s name.  They need to comprehend the nature of the document and who they are appointing as their agent under the POA.

Powers of Attorney are important legal tools that allow a person to name an agent to handle their financial or medical decision making.  These are crucial documents which must be executed according to the standards set forth in the law.  If the documents are not executed properly, it could invalidate the Power of Attorney.  One common problem is where people attempt to have their relative sign the Power of Attorney when they lack the proper mental capacity.

However, even if someone does not have the proper mental capacity, there are other routes which are available to the family members.  Often times the only choice for the family in this situation is to pursue a guardianship.  When this happens, one or more of the family members will petition a court to become the court-appointed guardian of their relative (known as the “Respondent”).  If the judge approves the petition, the family member(s) will have the ability to handle the personal and financial affairs of the Respondent, in the same manner that an agent under a Power of Attorney would act.

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